On sale!

Friedrich Wührer

8.99 € 6.75 €

Friedrich Wührer was one of the prominent representatives of the Austro-German piano school. Wührer was revered as the sublime master by other great pianists of his time, especially by Walter Gieseking, Wilhelm Backhaus, and Wilhelm Kempff. Wührer recorded the first nominally complete cycle of Schubert’s piano sonatas, but he did not record commercially Schubert’s Wanderer Fantasy or Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata. Our unique CD collects these German radio recordings for the first time ever.

Quantity:

Buy 20 or more in CD and get a 20% cart discount
Buy 10 to 19 in CD and get a 15% cart discount
Buy 5 to 9 in CD and get a 10% cart discount

FRIEDRICH WÜHRER plays Beethoven and Schubert

1-4. Beethoven: Piano Sonata No.29 in B-flat Major, Op.106 [41:03]
I. Allegro [10:11]
II. Scherzo: Assai vivace [02:31]
III. Adagio sostenuto [16:15]
IV. Introduzione: Largo…Prestissimo – Fuga: Allegro risoluto [12:04]
Recorded ∙ 17 November 1952 ∙ Stuttgart-Untertürkheim ∙ Alte Krone ∙ Süddeutscher Rundfunk ∙ Radio Studio Recording

5-8. Schubert: Fantasie in C major, D. 760 “Wanderer Fantasie” [20:51]
I. Allegro con fuoco ma non troppo [06:12]
II. Adagio [06:21]
III. Presto [04:31]
IV. Allegro [03:46]
Recorded ∙ 05 April 1954 ∙ Stuttgart-Untertürkheim ∙ Alte Krone ∙ Süddeutscher Rundfunk ∙ Radio Studio Recording

9. Beethoven: 12 Variations on a Russian Dance from Wranitzky’s “Das Waldmädchen”, WoO 71 [10:57]
Recorded ∙ 05 April 1954 ∙ Stuttgart-Untertürkheim ∙ Alte Krone ∙ Süddeutscher Rundfunk ∙ Radio Studio Recording

Please note that this free version of the booklet is for your personal use only! We kindly ask you to respect our copyright and the intellectual property of our artists and writers. Download DigiBooklet

Friedrich Wührer was one of the prominent representatives of the Austro-German school piano school. Wührer was revered as the sublime master by other great pianists of his time, especially by Walter Gieseking, Wilhelm Backhaus, and Wilhelm Kempff. Wührer recorded the first nominally complete cycle of Schubert’s piano sonatas, but he did not record commercially Schubert's Wanderer Fantasy or Beethoven's Hammerklavier Sonate. Our unique CD collects these German radio recordings for the first time ever.

Friedrich Wührer was born on June 29, 1900 in Vienna. He began piano study at age six with Marius Szudelsky; after entering the Vienna Academy in 1915, Wührer continued studying piano with Franz Schmidt (1915-1919), along with taking courses in conducting under Ferdinand Löwe and music theory under Joseph Marx (1918-1921). He also studied law and musicology at the University of Vienna. His performing career began in the early 1920s, and he toured Europe (Russia, Spain, England and Czechoslovakia) and the United States in 1923. He was one of the first pianist to include piano works by Reger, Schönberg, Bartok, Mjaskowsky and Feinberg in his recital programs.

Wührer was a founder of the International Society for Contemporary Music in Vienna. He formed friendships with composers Hans Pfitzner and Max Reger, and became associated with Arnold Schönberg and his circle, participating in performances of Schönberg’s setting of 15 poems from Das Buch der hängenden Gärten, op. 15; his Pierrot Lunaire as part of a touring company presenting the work in Spain; and Webern’s Pieces for Cello and Piano, op. 11. Wührer also performed music by Béla Bartók, Igor Stravinsky, Sergei Prokofiev, and Paul Hindemith. On July 3, 1930, he performed Schönberg student Paul Pisk’s Suite for Piano in the first broadcast of that composer’s music by the British Broadcasting Corporation. Wührer made his Salzburg Festival debut in 1938. In 1939, as Paul Wittgenstein, who commissioned the work, had fled Austria, Wührer performed in the premiere of Schmidt’s Quintet for piano, violin, clarinet, viola, and cello in A major, albeit in his own arrangement for two hands rather than, as originally written for piano, left hand alone. Thereafter, Wührer performed all the Schmidt left hand compositions in his own two-hand arrangements. He and Wittgenstein viewed each other with animosity; Wittgenstein accused Wührer of being an enthusiastic Nazi who later tried to cover it up, and Wührer disparaged Wittgenstein’s personality and pianism. Whether for this or some other reason, the recital programmes did not, as Wührer had promised Wittgenstein, make any note of the latter’s exclusive rights to the works, and as a descendent of Jews, Wittgenstein had no recourse in Nazi-governed countries.

Wührer continued his advocacy for modern works at least into middle age. For instance, he gave the premiere of Pfitzner’s Sechs Studien für das Pianoforte, op. 51, of which he was the dedicatee, shortly after its composition in 1943 and in the 1950s, he performed the Piano Concerto, op. 21, which was written in 1939 by Kurt Hessenberg. Nonetheless, notwithstanding his pioneering work for music of the Second Viennese School and other moderns of his day, Wührer’s principal focus as a performer, his posthumous reputation, and his recorded legacy came to rest on performances of music from the romantic era, particularly works in the German and Austrian traditions.

Later in life, Wührer was a juror at the Second Van Cliburn International Piano Competition from September 26 to October 9, 1966, which awarded first prize to Radu Lupu. Wührer was also a member of the piano jury at the 1968 Queen Elisabeth International Music Competition. Wührer’s son, also named Friedrich, was a violinist and conductor who made classical records. He was first married to the violinist Hilda Duchoslav, a pupil of Wolfgang Schneiderhan and later to the pianist Margaretha Jungbluth, a pupil of Franz Schmidt. Outside the concert hall, Wührer was head of a piano master class at the Academy for Music in Vienna (1921-1932), artistic director of the Vienna Academic Wagner Society (1920–1925), professor for piano at the Academy for Music in Berlin (1933-1934), head of a piano master class at the Conservatory of Mannheim (1934-1936), director of the Nordmark Conservatory of Kiel (1936-1938), again head of a piano master class at the Academy for Music in Vienna (1938-1945), teacher at the Mozarteum in Salzburg (1948-1951), and head of a piano master class at the Academy for Music in Munich (1955-1968). He was denied an academy teaching position in East Germany in 1952, however, on grounds that he had been a Nazi sympathizer in Austria during World War II. He held master classes in US and Japan.

Among Wührer’s editorial activities, he wrote Masterpieces of Piano Music (Wilhelmshaven, 1966); compiled a collection of works by old masters; and prepared editions of the Chopin Etudes, polonaises by Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, and the piano music of Franz Schmidt. Claiming to be respecting the composer’s own wishes, he created two-hand redistributions of the left-hand works that Schmidt had written for Paul Wittgenstein, although Wittgenstein evidently voiced strong objections. Besides editing the Etudes, Wührer wrote 18 Studies on Chopin Etudes in Contrary Motion (1958) as a pedagogical work for equalising the facility of both hands. Wührer also composed and published cadenzas for Mozart’s piano concerti in C Major, K. 467; C Minor, K. 491; and D Major, K. 537. Wührer made numerous commercial phonograph records. While his discography includes 78 rpm records, such releases are outnumbered by his output during the early LP era, which was mostly for the American Vox label. Among his LP recordings was the first nominally complete cycle of Schubert’s piano sonatas.

Friedrich Wührer died on December 27, 1975 in Mannheim.

Source: Margaretha Wührer-Jungbluth, Beflügelte Reisen. Mein Leben mit Friedrich Wührer. München–Salzburg 1981.

Download DigiBooklet

Download CD Front Cover ∙ High Resolution

Download CD Tray Cover ∙ High Resolution

Article number: MC 1023
UPC barcode: 791154053997
Recording dates: 1952-1954
Release date: March 2015
Total timing: 72:52

Producer and Audio Restoration: Lynn Ludwig
Booklet Notes: Michael Waiblinger
Design: Alessia Issara
Photographs: Valentin Kubina
With special thanks to Dr. Jürgen Linsenmeyer
From the Original Masters ∙ © 2015 Meloclassic